Sunil Bhat

Associate Partner

Sunil Bhat is an Associate Partner in MicroSave’s Digital Financial Services- Payments & Distribution Domain. He is a financial sector consultant with over eight years of experience in advising more than 40 financial institutions in India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Malawi, Liberia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Vietnam and the Philippines.

Sunil has an MBA from Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies in Mumbai and a B.Tech from the National Institute of Technology in Calicut. His areas of expertise include risk management in DFS agent networks, process re-engineering, strategic business planning, financial analysis, microfinance, responsible finance, and agent network strengthening and product development.

Posts by Sunil Bhat

How can FinTech TSPs support microfinance institutions to get on board the DEPA ecosystem?

This blog, the second in this series, discusses the role of FinTechs as technology service providers (TSPs) in enabling last-mile lenders, such as MFIs, to adopt the DEPA framework. Read the blog to understand how TSPs can help onboard these institutions onto the DEPA framework while providing other value-added services.

What holds back microfinance institutions from adopting the DEPA framework?

This blog discusses the Account Aggregator (AA) framework, a consent-based system under the IndiaStack that enables data sharing across financial institutions. Here we look at the framework from the perspective of financial inclusion and discuss how microfinance institutions, which cater largely to low and middle-income (LMI) customers, may struggle to adopt AA at this stage.

“How did the new pricing strategy increase the income for Eko agents?” – Lessons from a pilot with Eko India Financial Services

Incentives remain a critical factor besides others to steer agents’ decision-making to onboard or continue their business with a particular agent network manager (ANM). The level of compensation affects the motivation of BC agents and, in turn, the quality of service they provide through these agent outlets. This deck analyzes the journey of the FinTech platform Eko and how its new incentive structure for its large network of agents impacted their business.

Different yet similar—the behavioral biases of low- and moderate-income segments in Bangladesh and Vietnam

“We see the potential volume, but do we design profitable products for low-and moderate-income (LMI) people?” MSC faces this question repeatedly in discussions with our clients across Asia and Africa—including our partners in Bangladesh and Vietnam under the MetLife Foundation-funded i3 program. In the first blog, we raise the question on the key behavioral biases to keep in mind to create compelling, engaging, and profitable products for the low- and moderate-income segment. The second blog speaks of the similarities and differences in the LMI segment in Bangladesh and Vietnam. The blog also takes you through the lives and struggles of two personas—Morium from Bangladesh and Hoang from Vietnam.

Different yet similar — behavioral biases of low- and moderate-income people in Bangladesh and Vietnam

“We see the potential volume, but do we design profitable products for low-and moderate-income (LMI) people?” MSC faces this question repeatedly in discussions with our clients across Asia and Africa—including our partners in Bangladesh and Vietnam under the MetLife Foundation-funded i3 program. Through this two-blog series, we question key behavioral biases to consider while creating compelling, engaging, and profitable products for the low- and moderate-income segment. The first blog speaks of the macro-economy and demography of the Bangladesh and Vietnam markets. We also take you through the digital financial services progress in both countries and the steps governments take to expand digitally. The next blog in this series will look at the similarities and differences of the LMI segment in Bangladesh and Vietnam.

Credit for low- and moderate-income people in Bangladesh—can new-age banks and FinTechs deliver the regulator’s wish?

The waves of digitization and technological advancements have led to the opening of MFS accounts for 60% of the population in Bangladesh. The country now boasts more than 1.1 million agents. Despite the widespread use of MFS and internet access, only 9.1% of people access the formal credit system. Digital credit can be a stepping-stone in Bangladesh due to the lower cost of delivering credit through digital means, combined with the mass digital readiness of consumers. Several solutions have emerged from banks, NBFIs, FinTechs, MFSPs, MFIs, and development partners, such as City Bank’s “Nano Loan” product pilot to Prime Bank’s loan product for blue-collar workers. Together, stakeholders are trying to forge partnerships to address problems around access to credit and social development in Bangladesh.

Finarkein: Democratizing data in financial services

This blog talks about Finarkein Analytics, a technology service provider platform focused on simplifying the information value chain through its unique and innovative data analytics solution

NXTFIN-XaasTag: Technology-enabled mainstreaming of farmers’ collectives

XaasTag is an AgTech start-up that provides a digital, collaborative online marketplace. The platform connects agricultural commodity producers, such as farmer producer organizations (FPOs) at one end and institutional buyers at the other, and enables them to directly sell and buy from each other.